ALL ABOUT MITCH TRAPHAGEN: PHOTOGRAPHER and PHOTOJOURNALIST


1219106_300x300-1“With the web and social media, imagery is more important than ever. When I was a Congressional press secretary, I probably shot 10,000 frames of just one person (itself a challenge). But imagery sticks in the minds of viewers – and my goal is always to accurately show people whom my subject truly is. Through imagery, I’ve tried hard to convey that. With artists – an accurate image showing their passion and talent is worth well more than a thousand words. “
Mitch Traphagen

 

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We’ve had the great pleasure to get to know Mitch Traphagen through his photographs and films taken at Artists Without Walls’ Showcases and now with his photo work on the Artists Without Walls/Charles R. Hale production of a short film, “A Moment.”

 

A Moment Charles Hale Production

 

Who is Mitch?  Mitch is a photojournalist, a former Congressional press secretary, and a former systems developer and senior executive for a Fortune 30 corporation.

 

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He’s based in both the NYC and the Tampa Bay area. He is available to performing artists and for editorial, feature and documentary services — both photography and the written word.  For artists, he will work to not only document their unique talents but will also work within their budget.

 

A Moment Charles Hale Production

 

Since 2011 he has primarily gone to Leica for documentary photography with both the Leica M240 and the Leica M Monochrom cameras. In addition, he has a full compliment of professional Canon gear for both still photography and videography. His equipment also includes full professional audio recording capability and a full video editing suite.

 

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Over the years, Mitch has documented hundreds of lives, places and events. He works hard to ensure the images and words he uses accurately portray the subject. Borrowing from Gay Talese, he tells the truth in an interesting way.

 

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Since 2002, he has won more than 70 awards for excellence for editorial writing and photography from the Community Papers of Florida, an organization of newspapers with a combined readership of nine million people. Mitch is a member of the National Press Photographers Association and the Society of Professional Journalists. 

 

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You can learn more about Mitch and see his work by clicking here

 

You can contact Mitch at:

Tampa: (813) 426-4177 (text message preferred)

New York: (646) 926-7309 (text message preferred)

VERA HOAR’S PHOTOS from AWoW’s MAY SHOWCASE at THE CELL

 Vera Hoar’s photos from the Artists Without Walls’ Showcase at The Cell Theatre, May 26, 2015

Liv Mammone

Liv Mammone

 

Maritri Garrett

Maritri Garrett

 

Desiree Jacobs and John Munnelly

Front Row Seats

 

Desiree Jacobs and John Munnelly

Desiree Jacobs and John Munnelly

 

Niamh Hyland and Charles R. Hale

Niamh Hyland and Charles R. Hale

 

Dennis Demakos

Dennis Demakos

 

Hammerstep: Garrett Coleman and Jason Oremus

Hammerstep: Garrett Coleman and Jason Oremus

  

Ron Vazzano

Ron Vazzano

 

 

 

“SPOTLIGHT ON” POET LIV MAMMONE

Liv Mammone. Photo by Cat Dwyer

Liv Mammone. Photo by Cat Dwyer

Who is Liv Mammone?

 

Wow, no pressure! Ah…she’s almost 26 and trying to navigate her life as a bisexual, disabled woman poet, editor, and someday-novelist. She’s a  constant teacher and student simultaneously. Her mind is hungry. Her current artistic medium is herself as she tries to learn how to love herself.

 

What honors have you received for your poetry?

 

My poetry has recently appeared in wordgathering, Wicked Banshee, The Medical Journal of Australia, and the anthology Grabbing the Apple. This time in my life has been about putting myself on the radar of authors I admire; of seeing myself as their peer. Their respect and knowledge is my greatest honor.

 

Niamh Hyland and Liv Mammone

Niamh Hyland and Liv Mammone

Why have you chosen poetry over other forms of writing such as short stories, memoir or novels?

 

Well, my first love is the novel. But when I went to get my MFA and had to choose a genre, I chose poetry and it was full steam ahead. I felt that I had more to learn about poetry. Now, I think it’s more that I have a lot to learn and poetry is my best teacher. If I’m honest, I just started watching poetry videos on YouTube and decided those were the coolest people alive and I wanted to be one of them. The leaps of language one can make really mirrors the way my brain finds connections. I also really believe in poetry as a way to bring people together. I’m also really protective of it because there’s this constant discourse around it being “dead.”

 

What is/are your favorite poems or works of literature?

 

No matter how much I read I’ll never feel ready to answer this. I recently read Michel Faber’s novel The Crimson Petal and the White again and it holds up as the book I want to write. The Great Gatsby is a cliche but that was my first experience with heightened language and it changed everything. I’m obsessed with Jane Austen. In poetry there’s Tara Hardy’s collection Bring Down the Chandeliers, Jeanann Verlee’s Racing Hummingbirds, and Angel Nafis’s Blackgirl Mansion; but there are so many. Whatever I’m reading is what’s absorbing me but those are the books I go back to.

 

Liv Mammone and Connie Roberts. Photo by Cat Dwyer

Liv Mammone and Connie Roberts. Photo by Cat Dwyer

Who are the poets/writers you admire?

Again, a tremendous number; Connie Roberts was my mentor at Hofstra and I wouldn’t be me without her. Before that, I got my training from the New York slam poetry scene–Jeanann Verlee, Marty McConnell, Rachel McKibbens, Taylor Mali, Megan Falley, and the like. As a child, my mother got me hooked on the 90′s singer songwriter movement–women like Paula Cole, Natalie Merchant, and Shawn Colvin. their lyrics taught me to listen to language and gave me a lot of the tools I use.

 

Who is your greatest inspiration and why?

Everyone in my family is going to be mad if I don’t say them! My father. It’s thanks to his hard work that I am able to do what I love. He taught me about ambition, the value of education, and pushes me to be better.

 

What are the top five things you’d like to accomplish in the next five years?

 

Competing in a slam, writing a song, starting a novel, compiling a poetry manuscript, moving out of my parents’ house.

 

Liv Mammone

Liv Mammone

If you could dream of trying something in the arts you haven’t tried, but would like to, what would that be?

 

I love to sing. I’d really want to incorporate that into my work. I am also obsessed with actors; I think they are the most talented people on earth. So I’d like to try that and join the elite.

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What was the best gift that someone gave you that inspired or facilitated an interest in your art?

 

I have gotten so much support from so many different people about what I do. I’m absolutely sure there are more talented people in this world, but they aren’t working because no one has given them that simple gift of saying, “What you have to say is important; I believe in you.” I’m incredibly lucky to have been told that my work matters and always try to pay that forward to artists who move me. It’s incredibly easy, but it means everything.

 

Click here for Liv Mammone website

Click here for Liv Mammone’s Facebook page

 

“BRINGING TOGETHER DIVERSE PERFORMERS”: ANOTHER GREAT AWOW SHOWCASE COMING UP THIS TUESDAY

“In bringing together diverse performers…it makes for an event the likes of which you will rarely, if ever, experience. A melding of artists within the walls…it was a memorable night. Yes, it was that good.” Ron Vazzano

 

Ron Vazzano

Ron Vazzano

Yes, as Ron says, an AWoW Showcase is always “that good.” May’s Showcase is shaping up as more of the same.  And, Ron, a writer and poet, whose monthly on line “Muse-Letter,” a mix of essays, reviews, poems, quotes, wordplay, which has become quite popular among AWoW members and friends, will be one of the evening’s presenters. Ron’s essays have been posted on the Artists Without Walls’ website and he’s also read his poetry on a number of occasions at Showcases over the past year. In a former life, he spent some years as an actor appearing in theatrical productions in New York City as well as on the road. If past is prologue, Ron’s performance will be timely, witty and spot on. 

 

Hammerstep

Hammerstep

The dance group Hammerstep has had successful international performances, including at New York City’s Lincoln Center and The Palace Theatre on London’s West End, as well as an online viral video of their recent appearance on America’s Got Talent. We’re thrilled that Hammersmith’s founders, Garrett Coleman and Jason Oremus, will be performing for us on Tuesday. Traditionally trained in Irish Step dance as a child, Garrett has consistently found himself drawn to types of dance that are rhythmically innovative and that push the boundaries of athleticism through dance. Jason, originally from Sydney, Australia, Jason won 5 consecutive State and National Solo Irish dancing titles from 1999-2003. Both Garrett and Jason have toured with the world famous show, “Riverdance.”

 

 

Maritri Garrett

Maritri Garrett

Maritri Garrett recently performed at Rockwood Music Hall as part of AWoW’s “The Musical History of the Lower East Side.” Maritri played piano and sang a couple tunes from the American Songbook and then switched gears completely and accompanied Niamh Hyland on Blondie’s “Call Me.” A very gifted and multi-talented performer, Maritri also plays the cello and guitar. You can hear Maritri performing one of her original songs, “Rain” at the bottom of the page. 

 

 

Liv Mammone

Liv Mammone

Back for her second appearance at an AWoW Showcase will be poet Liv Mammone, a vivacious young voice that will be heard on the New York performance poetry circuit for years to come. Using her background as a novelist, she uses various characters, including Venus de Milo, a fictional gangster, and a certain part of her own anatomy, to provide insight into what she calls “all the million ways one must be moved; the changes we make on our migrations through the world.” Anyone who heard and saw Liv’s laugh out loud, brilliant reading of her poem “Vagina Resigning” won’t soon be forgetting that experience.

 

 

John Munnelly

John Munnelly

John Munnelly, who is an award winning ASCAP singer-songwriter with a social conscience, will be making his first appearance at an AWoW Showcase. Born in Ireland now of Brooklyn, John is known for his witty & humorous nature, sometimes performing under the stage name ‘LaughJohnLaugh.’  John is a prolific writer in many music genres from Pop to the Prophetic releasing his ‘Hello World’ album in 2013 (available on iTunes) He toured Ireland to promote the album release in 2013.  This will be John’s first appearance at an AWoW Showcase, which he says is, “Too good a show to miss – I’m playing three cracking songs. Hope to see you there.”

 

 

Dennis Demakos far right

Dennis Demakos far right

In the true spirit of multiculturalism, Dennis Demakos, who has been playing traditional Greek music and singing the tradtional folk music of dozens of countries from Europe, Asia, and the Middle and Near East for many years, Dennis will be making his first appearance at an AWoW Showcase. Dennis can be heard with two Bay Area California bands, The Disciples of Markos- disciplesofmarkos.com, and Balkalicious Fire Drive- bfdmusic.com. with whom he is pictured on the far right.

 

 

It promises to be a great night. Join us at The Cell Theatre, Tuesday, May 26. The bar opens at 6:45pm. See you there. 

 

 

 

JOHN MORAN and “THE LAST DAY” at THE CELL THEATRE in NYC

THE LAST DAY

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When what’s above the ground is as dark as what’s below, you know you’re getting close to “The Last Day.”

 

Artist Without Walls’ member John Moran is producing a reading of Pulitzer nominated playwright, Richard Vetere’s play, “The Last Day” at The Cell Theater at 338 W 23rd St. NYC.

 

The reading will take place Friday May 15th at 7:30 PM. Seats are limited so get there early..

 

John Moran

John Moran

Cast will include Broadway / Off-Broadway actors Tom Bozell and Michelle.Mazza, Lifetime Network Actress Sarah Cote doing stage directions and our own John Moran.

 

Directing the reading is Brian Patrick Reager, graciously on loan to us by Kira Simring, Artistic director of The Cell.

 

Richard Vetere has already had a successful run of this play at the Gloucester Stage in Gloucester Massachusetts and is working to bring the play to New York.

 

Among Richard’s other credits are the screenplay for “The Third Miricle” directed by Agnieszka Holland and starring Ed Harris and Anne Heche and the Pulitzer nominated play “One Shot One Kill.

 

Hope to see you all there.

SASHA PAPERNIK and AMANDA THORPE: FREE SHOWS at ROCKWOOD MUSIC HALL

 

Sasha Papernik and her band

Sasha Papernik and her band on Roosevelt Island in NYC

Two Artists Without Walls’ members, Sasha Papernik and Amanda Thorpe, will be be performing free shows at Rockwood Music Hall this week.  Sasha will be performing at Rockwood tomorrow, Sunday, May 3rd, at 6pm with two original bandmates: Kyle Saulnier on bass and Justin Poindexter on guitar. You can join Sasha for an evening of Russian dances and original songs.

 

In other news, Sasha is very excited to share that her arrangement of the Russian Folk Song “Vo Pole Bereza Stoyala” (In the Field Stood a Birch Tree) has been licensed to Carnegie Hall’s Link Up program and will be orchestrated and played by orchestras across the country! She will be performing the song live at Rockwood.

 

image1On Thursday night, May 7th, 7pm, Amanda Thorpe, AWOW’s member abroad, will be back in NYC and performing Bewitching Me: The Lyrics of Yip Harburg. Harburg, born and raised on the Lower East Side, is the oft unknown wordsmith of some of the most popular songs in America.  Two of Harburg’s most famous lyrics form brackets around the 1930s: “Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?” written for the musical Americana, told from the point of view of a WWI vet who’s standing in a breadline, wondering where his slice of the American dream is, and “Over The Rainbow,” sung by a girl clutching her dog, gazing into the heavens, wishing she could get the hell out of Kansas.

 

Amanda’s CD, Bewitching Me: The Lyrics of Yip Harburg has received wonderful reviews. Here’s what Tom Semioli,writing for the Huffington Post, said of Amanda’s singing. “Amanda’s organic rendition of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” turns subtly anthemic upon the arrival of the chorus…and (guitarist) Scherr’s exquisite solo on “Adrift on a Star” deeply echoes Thorpe’s seductive pathos.”

 

Amanda is looking forward to returning to New York City from Paris to perform these and other Harburg tunes at Rockwood. 

 

Rockwood Music Hall is located in Manhattan at 196 Allen Street.

 

 

DENI BONET and ANNETTE HOMANN: “EMBRACING a BRACE of VIOLINS”, by RON VAZZANO

EMBRACING A BRACE OF WOMEN ON VIOLINS

by Ron Vazzano

 

When you think of the violin, it’s usually in terms of something classical, something staid— even to the point of being stodgy—melodious, though somewhat somber, and often evocative of a lament in the key of bittersweet. For me, something along the lines of “Ashokan Farewell” by Jay Unger from the hit 1990 PBS mini-series “The Civil War,” readily comes to mind. (Was that 25 years ago already?). All in all, a beautiful instrument to behold, especially when beheld by a virtuoso who can make even an Alpha male weep.

 

On the other end of the scale, associations might be in the context of bluegrass or hoe down music, and at such times, thought of as a fiddle. Is there a difference between a violin and a fiddle? Not really, though it is a subject open to much discussion, debate and lots of wry commentary. A few one-liners I ran across on line:

 

  • When you are buying one, it’s a fiddle. When you are selling one, it’s a violin.
  • $125 per hour and a tuxedo.
  • You can’t play a violin barefoot.
  • A violin has strings, and a fiddle has strangs.
  • You’ll never find a violinist with a mullet.
  • A violin sings, but a fiddle dances.
  • It’s a matter of style. If you have style, it’s a fiddle.

 

And the people playing it? We tend to think male, with hall-of-fame names like Isaac Stern, Jascha Heifetz, Yehudi Menuhin and Itzak Perlman. In short, we think of violin players (though not fiddlers), as being of rather serious temperament and often rooted in European and “foreign” traditions. What you might call your father’s or grandfather’s violinists. That has changed.

 

Nowhere is that more in evidence for me, than with two violinists on the New York scene these days, who are turning the instrument and their performance on it, into something that shatters the glass of any stereotypes and preconceived notions.

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No, Deni Bonet and Annette Homann are not your father’s fiddlers.

 

As one music critic noted on a new generation of violinists in this mold, “they are on the whole, female, ultra-virtuosic, career-focused and glamorous besides.” To which I would add specific to these two women, possessing a sense of total performance—including everything from the addition of body movement and choreography, to their banter in between pieces—wit, irony, and sexy besides.

  

Deni Bonet is a classically trained violinist, whose rather impressive “liner notes” from her website read:

 

  • Deni has recorded and performed with Cyndi Lauper, R.E.M., Sarah McLachlin among many others…
  • performed at Carnegie Hall, the United Nations, and just recently at the White House for President Obama and the First Lady
  • Her music has been featured on HBO, NBC, American Airlines, several film and modern dance projects, and has been described by the Wall Street Journal as “like Cheryl Crow meets the B-52’s.”

 

Her unique style is fully on display in a video produced for her single “One in a Million” that was released along with her latest album It’s all good.

 

I caught her at a gig at the Rockwood Music Hall in downtown Manhattan last month, in a night paying homage to “The Musical History of the Lower East Side,” a musical show created by Charles R. Hale. Deni made even a Stephen Foster medley sound hip. And I had the pleasure over a year ago, of performing a spoken word piece in tandem with arrangements she composed and played specific to a collaboration entitled “Unrequited Love.” 

 

Annette Homann, classically trained and born in Germany : 

 

  • Has been performing since the age of six
  • She has toured throughout Europe, China, Central America, Canada and the U.S. and at various venues…
  • Including Carnegie Hall, Avery Fischer Hall, Alice Tully Hall, Symphony Space, New World Stages, and Brooklyn Bowl
  • Her extended techniques, and singing combining elements of bluegrass, blues, pop and classical with a theatrical vibe—the violin used in non-traditional ways, often replacing the guitar, and sometimes percussion— are in evidence on her recent CD, “Heimatgefühle” (German for “feelings of home”).

 

I got to see her live last month at a private art gallery event sponsored by Artists Without Walls in Chelsea. Her performance in covering Adele’s Skyfall, the theme song of the 2012 James Bond film of the same name, was at once both sexy and witty (and barefoot, defying a previously noted one- liner). It brought down the house.

 

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And while I have not caught a live performance of so called “hip-hop” violinist Lindsey Stirling, whose Crystallize video on YouTube has gotten an unfathomable 119,000,000 views since uploaded in February of 2012 (is that a misprint?), Deni and Annette are every bit as good and dynamic in my book. (And Muse-Letter). And does Lindsey Stirling drop by McSorely’s Old Ale House on a rainy spring afternoon, take out her violin in the backroom and play? Annette has.

 

I wonder what Itzak Perlman thinks about all of this sort of thing?

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Ron Vazzano, a writer, poet and actor, has been a frequent contributor to this website as well as performer at Artist Without Walls monthly showcases. You can read his column Muse Letter by clicking here

 

“GREAT, POSITIVE RECEPTION” at an ARTISTS WITHOUT WALLS’ SHOWCASE

“I’ve just come back from one of the coolest gigs I have had the pleasure of performing. It’s called Artists Without Walls.  What an excellent, upbeat, positive group of individuals. Thanks Clyde Berger for turning me onto them. Great positive reception to my music too.” Toby Tobias

 

Toby Tobias and Terry McCarthy

Toby Tobias and Terry McCarthy

And upbeat it was. The evening began in rocking style with Terry McCarthy and his new acoustic band featuring Gerry Griffen, Andy Sandel and Tom Monaghan. Terry played three songs from his latest release The Charm:  “By Any Chance,” “Sorrow Salsa” and “Just Today.” As an encore Terry debuted “Anything to Have You Here.” Click here to listen to Terry’s music.  

 

Connie Roberts

Connie Roberts

Connie Roberts read three poems from her newly released collection Little Witness.  “This is the poetry of rock-hard experience. It will skin your soul,” New York Times journalist Dan Barry wrote. Her first poem, “Inheritance,” memorialized 35 children and one old woman who perished in an orphanage fire in Cavan town in 1943.  Her poem “For the Love of God” was an homage to an orphanage housemother, Miss Winifred Carberry, who took care of her as a child.  And,  just to prove that there are in fact a few happy poems, alongside the Irish-miserable-childhood ones in Little Witness, Connie finished with a life-affirming piece entitled “Campground: The Adirondacks.”  Little Witness is available by clicking here

 

 

Vincent Cross

Vincent Cross

“Well done to you and your team of volunteers. Community!  I really enjoyed performing, and was mighty impressed with the talent. Such a diverse group of artists displaying their multi-talents,” Vincent Cross said. 

 

Vincent, mixing guitar and harmonica, performed his sombre songs of jealousy, murder and biblical redemption, “Childish Things,” “Cursed,” and “Bowed Down” with a voice both high of tenor and plaintive in tone.  Picking the guitar with melody, chords and bass lines, the hard knock songs of the wayfarer came to life. 

 

Richard Stillman

Richard Stillman

“Spirit of Vaudeville,” performed by Richard Stillman and Flip Peters, captivated the AWoW audience. Richard is a entertainer in the style of the jazz age performers of the 1920′s. His combination of banjo playing, tap dancing, singing, ukulele strumming, storytelling, harmonica & bones playing and juggling is a joy to watch. Flip Peters is an excellent jazz guitarist and accompanies the show with great skill. We look forward to the full show on June 11th at the Concert Space at Beethoven Pianos, which Project 142 is sponsoring.  

 

Charles R. Hale

Emcee Charles R. Hale

First time AWoW performer South African-born singer-songwriter and musician Toby Tobias followed with and a performance style that could be described as a colorful combination of African rhythms interspersed with American country, folk and jazz, with lyrics that are both thought-provoking and uplifting. His music was thoroughly enjoyed by an appreciative audience, especially ‘Madiba’, a song Toby wrote in dedication to Nelson Mandela. Toby has been living in the United States for 27 years and performs his brand of music throughout Long Island, Brooklyn and the tri-state area. Click here to check out his music.

 

Shu Nakamura, John Liam Shea and Jenny Evans

Shu Nakamura, John Liam Shea and Jenny Evans

John Shea read a short story “The Guilt and the Ghosts” from a new collection of the same title with accompaniment from fiddler Jenny Evans. “John’s short story was pure poetry! Simply brilliant. I loved the rhythm, the wit, the pathos–it had it all going on. And I loved Jenny’s accompaniment on the fiddle. It reinforced all of the aforementioned. Fantastic collaboration.” Connie Roberts

 

Shu Nakamura and Niamh Hyland

Shu Nakamura and Niamh Hyland

Shu Nakamura performs solo with his band “the Ninja Orchestra” and collaborates with other artists regularly in NY area and Japan. Shu plays what he calls “folk-root” music, as well as rock material such as the two songs that rocked the house, “Train Song” and “Rain Dance. ” Shu was then joined by AWoW’s cofounder Niamh Hyland who sang a stirring version of the Irish classic, “Wild Mountain Thyme” and closed with a rousing rendition of “Resurrection.” 

 

All photos by Vera Hoar. AWoW’s next Showcase will be at The Cell Theatre on Tuesday, May 26th, 6:45pm. 

 

 

VERA HOAR’S PHOTOS CAPTURE AWoW’s APRIL SHOWCASE at THE CELL

Vera Hoar’s photos from Artists Without Walls’ Showcase at The Cell Theatre, April 28, 2015

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Terry McCarthy, Andy Sandel, Gerry Griffen and Tom Monaghan

Terry McCarthy, Andy Sandel, Gerry Griffen and Tom Monaghan

Shu Nakamura

Shu Nakamura

Connie Roberts

Connie Roberts

Toby Tobias

Toby Tobias

John Liam Shea and Jenny Evans

John Liam Shea and Jenny Evans

Vincent Cross

Vincent Cross

Richard Stillman and Flip Peters

Richard Stillman and Flip Peters

Terry McCarthy and Charles R. Hale

Terry McCarthy and Charles R. Hale

Shu Nakamura

Shu Nakamura

TALENT GALORE at AWoW’s SHOWCASE at THE CELL THEATRE, TUESDAY 4/28

Vincent Cross

Vincent Cross

“This is a note of thanks to Artists Without Walls for supporting my efforts through pictures and words these past months. I’ve been working as an actor for at least twenty five years now and I’ve never before been involved in anything quite like this. AWoW is a unique blessing. So happy to be a member.” Jack O’Connell, actor, New York

 

 Here’s the lineup for AWoW’s April Showcase:

 

Vincent Cross, who first performed with AWoW in its show “Rise Up Singing: Women in the Labor Movment,” will be performing at his first Showcase. Vincent will be drawing from the purist of mountains springs to present original urban Americana stories. Said, Vincent, “These will be performed in the high lonesome sound on guitar/banjo.” 

 

Connie Roberts

Connie Roberts

Connie Roberts, a County Offaly native, emigrated from Ireland to the U.S. in 1983.  She has won many awards for her poetry including the Patrick Kavanagh and the Listowel Writers’ Week awards. She will be reading from her just released debut volume, Little Witness, a collection of poetry inspired by her experiences growing up in an industrial school (orphanage) in Ireland.

  

Terry McCarthy

Terry McCarthy

Here’s what Jack Silbert, DJWriter at satin wound.com  said about singer/songwriter Terry McCarthy. “Terry really turns on the charm on his album, The Charm, with a warm strum and even warmer vocals throughout. With tremendous backing musicians, the record presents a wide variety of sounds, never falling into a folky funk….but the secret weapon is McCarthy’s sharp, melodic songwriting, on Beatlesque tracks such as “Loneliest Boy” and the should-be-a-hit “Just Today.” Terry will be joined by Andy Sandel , Gerry Griffen and Tom Monaghan.

 

Paul Byrne and Richard Stillman

Paul Byrne and Richard Stillman

 

Richard Stillman and guitarist Flip Peters will  be performing  numbers from Richard’s show,”The Spirit of Vaudeville,” including a tap dancing Charleston played on tenor banjo, a short story that finishes with Richard tap dancing while playing the harmonica & bones while juggling and a novelty ukulele routine. “The Spirit of Vaudeville” won a Best Concert Award at the 2014 United Solo Theater Festival. 

 

 

Toby Tobias

Toby Tobias

Toby Tobias was born and raised in Johannesburg, South Africa. Toby has immersed himself in all genres of American Music of the last fifty years. His interest in African Rhythms & World Music, coupled with his keen ear for highly intuitive arrangements, has been the hallmark of his writing and performance styles, and he has garnered a strong following of listeners on Long Island and beyond. He will be performing a song called ‘Madiba’, dedicated to the life of Nelson Mandela.

 

 

Shu Nakamura

Shu Nakamura

Shu Nakamura, a Japan born – Brooklyn based musician, guitar player, multi-instrument player, composer, singer-song-writer, music producer. Shu moved to NY in 1999, has been a NY music scene layer. He just returned from his 2015 Japan tour with his rock band called “the Ninja Orchestra”. Shu will be performing his original material, as well as teaming up with Niamh Hyland  for a tune or two. 

 

The bar opens at 6:45, the show begins around 7:15. Hope to see you at The Cell Theatre, located at 338 W23rd St.