MULTI-TALENTED LINE UP ON TAP at AWOW’S SHOWCASE at THE CELL, TUESDAY, JULY 28th.

“We are given the opportunity to share our creative work and be received by a truly supportive and empathetic audience of fellow AWoW members and their guests. AWoW’s talented artists revitalize my spirit giving me strength and passion as I pursue my craft.” Michelle Macau

 

Noah Hoffeld

Noah Hoffeld

A great lineup of talent has been assembled for Artists Without Walls’ July Showcase at The Cell Theatre beginning with cellist Noah Hoffeld.  The soulful maturity of Noah’s new album Play Human belies the fact that Noah comes from a life in Classical Music. But playing Classical was never everything to Noah. Before graduating from Juilliard, he began pushing the limits by improvising, bringing rock and pop to the cello, and asking questions that would push his career beyond the ordinary. Cellist Noah has played for the likes of Renee Fleming, Philip Glass, Bebel Gilberto, and Brad Mehldau and records solos for films and television such as The Skeleton Twins (starring Kristin Wiig and Bill Hader), and Showtime’s Happyish. Noah will be singing a few songs from his new album and accompanying himself on piano and cello.

 

Richard Stillman

Richard Stillman

Richard Stillman is an all around performer. As an actor he has performed on Broadway, the Kennedy Center and in regional theater. These days he is mostly performing his own shows in schools, libraries and care centers. He will be telling at the New Jersey Storytelling Festival on Sept. 20th and will be performing his Spirit of Vaudeville show in Summit, NJ on Sept. 27th. During Tuesday,’s Showcase Richard will be telling two of his own stories. One is from the highlands of Scotland and the other is from the highlands of Peru.  

 

 

I.S. Jones

I.S. Jones

With a commanding stage presence and stirring poems of triumph, tribute, and forgiveness, I.S. Jones’s poetry stunned the audience into roaring “amens” at AWoW’s March Showcase. If you missed her you have a chance to meet her and hear her work at this Tuesday’s Showcase at The Cell.  I.S. is recent transplant from Southern California, is currently a graduate candidate at Hofstra University and she is a teaching colleague of Connie Roberts. I.S. was recently asked to come onboard as an editor-in-chief at Encore Radio Show, a show that delves into the culture and history of hip-hop. She is the winner of the Power Poetry Scholarship and publishes in several other literary magazines such as Harpoon Review, Chaparral, and Fat City Review.

 

Nick Garr (center)

Nick Garr (center)

 

Nick Garr, whose photo left was taken while performing Jerome Robbins” “Broadway” will be presenting  a character from his show “The Mob Psychic” and presenting it in a way that will be completely new and original to an AWoW Showcase.  Sam Adelman has been working with Nick on his web series, and will be shooting Nick’s scene for his series. Get ready for some real excitement. 

 

Ed Romanoff

Ed Romanoff

Ed Romanoff, whose song “St Vincent de Paul” won Song of the Year from the Nashville Songwriters Association, and whose  self-titled debut was a Roots Radio Top 100 for 2012, and ranked as high as number 12 on the European Americana Charts.  Ed will be performing a not yet recorded “old tune” about the claddagh ring (might Niamh Hyland join him?) and possibly a song he recently wrote which “…was inspired by Connie Robert’s moving book launch,” said Ed.

 

Alex Shapiro

Alex Shapiro

And rounding out the evening’s entertainment is first time AWoW presenter, Alex Shapiro. Alex is a poet born and raised in Beacon, New York. Having completed his undergraduate studies at Northeastern University this past May, he will be moving to the Midwest this Fall to pursue his MFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

Join emcees Niamh Hyland and Charles R. Hale for a great night of fun an entertainment The Cell Theatre, Tuesday, July 28th, 338 W23rd St. The doors open at 6:45pm.

 

 

 

 

A KATE McLEOD, E.L DOCTOROW, KEN BURNS’ STORY

A Kate McLeod, E.L. Doctorow, Ken Burns Story

by Kate McLeod

—–

 

When I was with Time Magazine, I was doing a special section on the Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island anniversary. I wrote to E.L. Doctorow and a few other luminaries and finally asked E. L. (Edgar) to write the piece for me.

 

Kate McLeod

Kate McLeod

We had lunch and I talked about how I saw the essay. We left the lunch in agreement. I had about a month to put the piece to bed, but a week after I’d met with E.L. he called me. He’d read something in the paper about Lee Iacocca’s involvement in the Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island Foundation, (Iacocca, who was running Chrylser a the time, raised money and the awareness of that project.) which completely set him off. He told me he was changing the essay so as to rail against corporate interests and Iacocca in particular.

 

“That’s not what we had in mind here at Time,” I said. “What we want is a celebration of how immigration made America great.” But he was determined to rail. So we came to an impasse. Now I’m thinking, I have three weeks and I am in a complete panic—heart-racing-panic.

 

My husband, Jerry Flint, after listening to my tale of woe, said, “You know I saw this film on PBS and it seems to me that film includes all of the stuff you want for the essay.”

 

E. L. Doctorow

E. L. Doctorow

“Great,” I said, “But it’s a film on PBS. What’s that going do for me?”

 

Jerry said, “I’ll get a copy of it and we’ll watch it.”

 

We did. It was a film by some guy named Ken Burns who was from New Hampshire. I called Florentine Films in Walpole, NH and I got Ken on the phone and told him that I would like to take his film, put it into essay form and publish it in Time Magazine. He was coming to New York the next week so we agreed to get together and have dinner. Ken, Jerry and I had dinner and talked about it. Ken said go ahead; he agreed to make an essay.

 

Ken Burns

Ken Burns

With two weeks before my deadline, Jerry, an award-winning journalist for Forbes Magazine, sat down at the computer and made an incredibly beautiful essay out of Ken’s film, for which he wouldn’t take a dime. In those days we paid writers and artists real money in my department so I gave the money to Florentine Films and I took Jerry to dinner at Lutece, where its much celebrated owner, Andre Soltner, came to the table to visit.

 

It was quite a project. The essay was very beautiful, everything I had hoped it would be for the readers. And we even obtained historic photos from a stock photo company, which I think became the now very well known supplier of photos, Corbis. I always felt bad about parting company with Doctorow but, other than that, it was a wonderful project and a great experience.

ARE YOU A GOOD CONVERSATIONALIST?

ARE YOU A GOOD CONVERSATIONALIST?

by Charles R. Hale

 

Are you a good conversationalist? Ask yourself these two questions: Am I more concerned with being interesting or interested? Am I listening or waiting to speak, constantly on the verge of interruption? I know this: The person who is speaking will understand if we’re paying attention or not. You know when someone isn’t really paying attention, don’t you?

 

Has a friend ever said to you, “We must talk,” and then, after an hour or so, the friend says, “Gee, thanks, that was a great conversation. Very helpful, I really enjoyed it.” And you walk away saying to yourself, “Great conversation? It seems I hardly said a word.

 

good-listenersWell, maybe you’re a good listener. Do you listen? Aren’t the best conversationalists also the best listeners?  They are easy to pick out; you know them. They acknowledge by nodding, and adding, “I see,” and “umm hmm.” They may ask questions or paraphrase something you’ve said, indicating they know exactly what you are speaking about.

 

Active listening, as opposed to hearing sounds, is not unlike looking at a photograph of a scene as opposed to a painting. A photograph offers us what the photographer wants us to see. There are many other angles but we see only one; we focus on one aspect captured with the lens of the camera. That’s what we do when we hear “words.” We focus on one aspect of the “entire” conversation.


guernica01

 

A painting, however, allows the artist more freedom. The entire experience may be seen simultaneously. An example of this would be Pablo Picasso’s painting, “Guernica.” Painted in response to the aerial bombardment of the Basque town, Guernica, during the Spanish Civil War, Picasso shows the suffering that war inflicts on innocent civilians. The painting doesn’t capture a single moment, but rather a number of scenes and events, allowing the viewer to experience the multiplicity of feelings and emotions expressed in the painting. It’s the simultaneity of the whole painting that creates the impact.

 

securedownload-5Similarly, a good listener interprets the entire conversation, absorbing and interpreting movement, facial expressions, empty spaces, sounds and silences. They “hear” the story that is being “painted.”

 

Years ago my sister said of a picture of me—I was on a boat near Nantucket—“That’s your listening face. That’s when I know you are really paying attention. Your head tilts to one side, your face tightens a bit, you don’t say much, but it seems as if you are looking through my words.”

 

At times I need to remind myself to allow others the space in which they can explore their thoughts and emotions. I need to resist the temptation of jumping in with solutions. Perhaps in silence and understanding I can create an environment where the speaker can look through his or her words, hear them, process them, and see the solutions to problems that reside within.

 

Then at last a voice in the gloom

Seemed to cry I hear you.

I hear your fears

Your torment and your tears.

.

“No One Would Listen” from The Phantom of the Opera

GREAT MUSIC and ITS HISTORY

GREAT MUSIC and ITS HISTORY

by Charles R. Hale

 

Recently, a  friend asked how I developed an interest in classical music.  My mother gets the credit for that one.  When I was a young boy in Glen Oaks, Queens, the local supermarket had classical albums for sale at the check out counter. Every so often my mother would buy one and thus, at any early age, I was introduced to classical music, including the works of Beethoven, Mozart, Rachmaninoff, Bach and others. By the time I reached my teens, however, I rarely listened to classical music and, like most teens, I soaked up the music of the era, The Beatles, the Beach Boys, the  Rolling Stones, the Shirelles and many others. 

 

During my senior year in college, for reasons I can’t recall, I bought a ticket to a New York Philharmonic concert at Lincoln Center. The only thing I remember about the program was that it included Igor Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring. I was hooked. Soon I was attending concert after concert at Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall and the 92nd Street Y. My interest in this musical genre has remained keen ever since.

 

Occasionally, a friend might say, “I’d like to begin building a classical music library. Can you send me a list of your favorite classical music recordings?” There are too many to include in a list of favorites, but typically I’ll start with a few that are not only great works but have an interesting history, which also interests me. Here’s a sampling: Four great works, out of hundreds in the classical repertory, including some great recordings of each.

 

Anton Dvorak’s Cello Concerto, Op. 104: Dvorak began work on this concerto in his East 17th St. apartment in NYC in 1884 and finished it in Prague the following year. On March 28, 1937, George Szell, conducting the Czech Philharmonic, along with cellist Pablo Casals, who was at the peak of his powers, his playing ennobling and lyrical, unleashed a stunning performance of the concerto. The recording is a tour de force, from the rapier life thrust of the cello in the opening movement, all the way to the concluding sinuous duet between cello and orchestra, and ending in a blaze of glory. I’ve often wondered what impact the political stirrings of the day had on this recording: Ethnic tensions were running high in Czechoslovakia and the scent of war was in the air; the Wermacht was planning an invasion of Czechoslovakia, and a year later the Munich agreement was signed ceding the Sudetenland to Germany.

 

 

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92. In 1936 Arturo Toscanini announced that he was leaving his post as the musical director of the New York Philharmonic after an eight-year stay. On April 9, shortly before his farewell performance at Carnegie Hall, Toscanini conducted a recording of Beethoven’s Seventh, which captures the clarity and propulsion that stamped his music and became known as the “Toscanini sound.” It’s also interesting to note the connection with Nazi Germany, since many feel that Toscanini’s performances and recordings of Beethoven’s symphonies were a public and musical repudiation of Nazi tyranny. The second movement marked “Allegretto,” was used to great effect in the recent film “The King’s Speech.” Here’s Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony Orchestra at Carnegie Hall, November 10, 1951. 

 

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 20 in D Minor, K466. Mozart composed fifteen piano concertos between the years 1782 and 1786, including the D Minor, premiered by Mozart himself, in February 1875. During this stretch, which may have been the peak of Mozart’s creative powers, he often performed one new work each week. The second movement marked, “Romanze” is brilliant. The movement begins with a simple theme and then (at the 4:05 mark in the recording I’ve provided) there is an outburst in the piano and orchestra with gorgeous exchanges between the piano and the oboes, flutes and bassoons, which is followed (at 6:43 in the recording) by the return of the original theme. This is a sublime work and may be my favorite two and one-half-minutes of music of any kind. The recording I’ve enjoyed most through the years is Daniel Barenboim’s with the English Chamber Orchestra, which isn’t available on youtube. The performance I’ve selected features pianist Friedrich Gulda with the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra. 

 

 

Jean Sibelius’s Symphony No. 5 in E-Flat Major, Op.82. Sibelius’s early works were often nationalistic in nature, in fact, his most popular work, Finlandia, was banned by the Russian czar during times of unrest. Sibelius began work on his Fifth Symphony during the early years of WWI and premiered it in December of 1915. He was not satisfied with the work and rewrote it at least twice, the final version being completed in 1918. As with much of Sibelius’s work there is strong feel of nature and the North country. I find the last movement, which begins with the whirrings of the string section and ending magisterially, particularly moving. Many consider Serge Koussevitzky’s recording with the Boston Symphony Orchestra the preeminent recording of this work. The recording here, led by Esa Pekka Salonen and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, is a very fine recording of Sibelius’s work.

 

 

 

 

I CONCENTRATE ON YOU

 

I CONCENTRATE ON YOU

by Charles R. Hale

 

 

Cole Porter

Cole Porter

Cole Porter wrote “I Concentrate on You” on the eve of America’s entrance into WWII.  During the war Viktor Frankl, an Austrian psychiatrist, and author of “Man’s Search For Meaning,” and his wife, Tilly, spent time in a number of concentration camps, including Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen. I never considered the parallel nature of Porter’s lyrics or the words Frankl penned until quite recently.

 

Frankl recorded his memories in his book after the war ended.  At the core of Frankl’s theory is the belief that man’s primary motivational force is his search for meaning.

 

Man's Search for Meaning

Man’s Search for Meaning

Here’s a passage from his book:

 

I was struggling to find the reason for my sufferings, my slow dying.  In a last violent protest against the helplessness of imminent death, I sensed my spirit piercing through the enveloping gloom.  I felt it transcend that hopeless, meaningless world, and from somewhere I heard a victorious “Yes” in answer to my question of the existence of an ultimate purpose….For hours I stood hacking at the icy ground.  The guard passed by, insulting me, and once again I communed with my beloved.  More and more I felt that she was present, that she was with me: I had the feeling that I was able to touch her, able to stretch out my hand and grasp hers.  The feeling was very strong: she was there.”

 

Frankl was continually seeking solace in the last thing he had control of, the only freedom he hadn’t relinquished, his capacity to love.  When his only positive achievement was enduring his suffering, when in utter desolation he was surrounded by death, he clung to the thought of his beloved wife, Tilly, who died in Bergen-Belsen at the age of twenty-four.  They stripped him of his writings and research, his clothing, and even his hair; he retained the freedom of his private thoughts.  He created his own reality. That sustained him.

 

Cole Porter (right)

Cole Porter (right)

I thought of this passage one morning while I was working out Cole Porter’s “I Concentrate on You” on the piano. I was familiar with the song; I’d heard a number of artists perform it, including Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra and Tony Bennett. But this time, as I began playing the song, I spoke the words aloud and they moved me in a way they never had.

 

Whenever skies look gray to me and trouble begins to brew

Whenever the winter-winds become too strong, I Concentrate on You

On your smile so sweet, so tender. when at first your kiss I decline.

On the light in your eyes when you surrender and once again our arms intertwine.

 

When fortune cries “nay, nay” to me and people declare, “You’re through,”

Whenever the blues become my only song, I Concentrate on You.

And so when wise men say to me that love’s young dream never comes true.

To prove that even wise men can be wrong, I concentrate, and concentrate on you.

 

Tilly and Viktor Frankl

Tilly and Viktor Frankl

During the war years Porter moved between Hollywood and New York City, while Frankl moved between camps in Theresienstadt, in what is now the Czech Republic, Auschwitz, Poland, and Turkheim in Bavaria, Germany. For years I thought of Porter’s lyrics as everyday words of love and adoration, painted with loving attention. Yet, when I read Frankl’s words describing the profound love he felt for his wife, Tilly, words that are quite similar to Porter’s, somehow I felt his words were sacred. And now I wonder, why do I make distinctions between the sacred and the everyday? There are none.

 

STELLAR PERFORMANCES at ARTISTS WITHOUT WALLS’ JUNE SHOWCASE at THE CELL THEATRE

“Performing at Artists Without Walls is a deep privilege and a pleasure.  To appear as part of a lineup of such talented artists is simultaneously thrilling and humbling.  I always leave AWoW with a soaring spirit, full of gratitude for the gifts of my fellow artists, and newly energized and encouraged in my own work. Mille Grazie to Charles Hale and Niamh Hyland for creating this warm, welcoming community.” Angela Alaimo O’Donnell, poet/author

 

—–

 

Angela Alaimo O'Donnell

Angela Alaimo O’Donnell

Angela Alaimo O’Donnell began Artists Without Walls’ June Showcase at The Cell Theatre by delighting the crowd with her recitation of “Crossing Irish,”  a sequence of poems exploring her predicament as a Sicilian woman fatally in love with Ireland.  Full of echoes of Irish poetry and the music of everyday speech, the poems were by turns sharp-witted and humorous, poignant and full of longing, culminating in a final recognition of her double-minded state: “I don’t belong. / I could make myself a life there.”  (This sequence of poems appeared on Artists Without Walls blog in March 2014.)

 

 

Michelle Macau and Sarah Hammer

Michelle Macau and Sarah Hammer

Michelle Macau and Sarah Hammer brought to vivid life the story of a break-up in Burying Elephant, a one-act play by Robin Rice Lichtig.  The dramatic and vibrant performances were genuine and poignant, bringing as some viewers remarked, laughter and a few tears.  “Artists Without Walls is a muse, a gift to artists stimulating the creative life energy,” said Michelle. “We are given the opportunity to share our creative work and be received by a truly supportive and empathetic audience of fellow AWoW members and their guests. AWoW’s talented artists revitalize my spirit giving me strength and passion as I pursue my craft.”

 

 

Scott Brieden, Phoebe Farber and Ruby Hankey

Scott Brieden, Phoebe Farber and Ruby Hankey

First time performer and new member Phoebe Farber presented a wonderful short play, Class Reunion, about a high school reunion that goes awry– starring two fine actors Ruby Hankey and Scott Breiden.  “I had a great time at AWoW’s Showcase. So wonderful to be in the midst of talented and supportive artists.  I’m hooked!” said Phoebe. 

 

 

Allison Sylvia

Allison Sylvia

Allison Sylvia performed two more pieces – L to the A and aDAm(BEcoming)eDEn – for an appreciative audience, once again incorporating spoken word, song, chant and dance.  Said, Allison, “Artists Without Walls is a warm supportive community of fellow artists – every showcase brings in new, exciting talent and new work from familiar faces. It is always an event to look forward to for inspiration.”

 

Serena Jost

Serena Jost

 

 

 

Serena Jost wowed AWoW with her new whimsical voice-cello songs. She also sang an affecting ballad commemorating the 100th anniversary of WW1.  “Performing for an always attentive AWoW audience inspires me,” said Serena.  “Every showcase is a delight!”

 

 

Michael Muller, Niamh Hyland, Deni Bonet and Cecil Hooker

Michael Muller, Niamh Hyland, Deni Bonet and Cecil Hooker

 

The final act of this great night, Too Many Lauras, featured AWoW members singer/songwriter Peter Nolan (aka Peter Chance) on guitar, Cecil Hooker on violin and Mike Muller on bass, performing original compositions.  The songs range from discovering new love to life as a vampire to helping a distressed friend.  A big surprise was spoken word artist Allison Sylvia returning during the third song, “Holding On,” to dance during the solo and sing on the last verse and chorus. The showcase ended with a cover of Chris Isaak’s “Wicked Game” with Niamh Hyland and Deni Bonet joining the band and the entire audience singing along in the refrains.  

 

 

Peter Nolan aka Peter Chance

Peter Nolan aka Peter Chance

Another brilliant evening.

 

The next Artists Without Walls’ Showcase will be on July 28th, 6:45pm at The Cell Theatre, 338 W23rd St. 

 

All photos by Vera Hoar

VERA HOAR’S PHOTOS from AWoW’S JUNE SHOWCASE at THE CELL THEATRE

Vera Hoar’s photos from the Artists Without Walls’ June Showcase.

 

Michael Muller

Michael Muller

Scott Brieden, Phoebe Farber and Ruby Hankey

Scott Brieden, Phoebe Farber and Ruby Hankey

Allison Sylvia

Allison Sylvia

 

Peter Chance, Niamh Hyland, Michael Muller, Cecil Hooker and Deni Bonet

Peter Chance, Niamh Hyland, Michael Muller, Cecil Hooker and Deni Bonet

Michelle Macau and Sarah Hammer

Michelle Macau and Sarah Hammer

Connie Roberts and Angela Alaimo O'Donnell

Connie Roberts and Angela Alaimo O’Donnell

Serena Jost

Serena Jost

JOIN ARTISTS WITHOUT WALLS for its SHOWCASE at THE CELL THEATRE, TUESDAY, JUNE 23RD.

Michael Muller

Michael Muller

Here’s what bassist Michael Muller, who will be part of Tuesday’s Showcase at The Cell, said of a recent AWoW gathering, ““Lovely and talented! Brilliant across the board; Martina, Allison, Kathleen, and Annette. Happy I was able to attend; super sounds, sights and words – magical evening it was!” 

 

 

We have a great lineup planned:

 

 

Phoebe Farber

Phoebe Farber

 

Phoebe Farber is a playwright living in Montclair, New Jersey. Her plays have been seen in New York and New Jersey, including Luna Stage, Strangedog, Horse Trade Theater, The Players Theatre, Short Play Lab, The Chain Theater, and The Depot Theater in Garrison NY. This fall she will begin a residency at Playwrights Theater of New Jersey’s Emerging Women Playwrights. Phoebe will be presenting a scene from her short play “Class Reunion.

 

 

Angela Alaimo O'Donnell

Angela Alaimo O’Donnell

 

Angela Alaimo O’Donnell will be returning for her second Showcase presentation. Angela is the author of six books of poems, three books of prose, essays about poetic craft, contemporary poetry and the nexus between faith, art and literature. Her work is highly personal and always powerfully presented. If you haven’t heard or met Angela, here’s your chance. She’s wonderful. 

 

Michelle Macau

Michelle Macau

 

Michelle Macau actor, theater director and producer with a passion for storytelling, who adapts and applies her skills to train non-performers in the techniques of improvisational acting, will be doing a two-character, ten-minute play with Sarah Hammer and written by Robin Rice Lichtig entitled Burying Elephants

 

Serena Jost

Serena Jost

 

 

 

Here’s what “Time Out NY” wrote about singer/songwriter/cellist Serena Jost. “”Serena Jost writes gently eccentric songs and sings them in an elegant alto, often accompanying herself on cello, but it isn’t quite right to call her a singer-songwriter. The term art song—normally tied to 19th-century concert music—usefully characterizes Jost’s carefully arranged pieces and succinct lyrics, neither quite rock nor folk”

 

Allison Sylvia

Allison Sylvia

 

 

Allison Syliva, a recent graduate of NYU, is a thinking young woman who melds song, dance, poetry, and chant  in her work, which often ends with the crowd on the edge of their seats. Allison enthralls her audience with her character dramatizations be they cello players or unrequited lovers, transforming scraps of script into art. It’s exciting to watch her perform. If you haven’t seen her you’re in for a treat. 

 

Peter Chance and Cecil Hooker

Peter Chance and Cecil Hooker

 

 

Closing out the show will be musicians Cecil Hooker, Peter Chance and Michael Muller. Their first piece will be “Wide Open,” a duo with Cecil and Peter. Michael will join them for two more tunes, “Holding On” and “Ancient Curse.” Knowing how talented and creative these fellows are, and knowing how creative and collaborative some of our members are–particularly Allison and Niamh Hyland–it wouldnt surprise me if this act takes a few twists or turns. Join us and find out. 

 

The Cell Theatre is located at 338 W23rd St. The  doors open at 6:45  See you then. 

 

 

“ON THE TOWN” with ARTISTS WITHOUT WALLS: THE WEEK of JUNE 14, 2015

Kira Simring and Nancy Manocherian

Kira Simring and Nancy Manocherian

Nancy Manocherian’s play “Hey Jude,” directed by Kira Simring at Urban Stages. Tickets are $45, but AWoW members can get them for $20 by emailing info@artistswithoutwalls.com Performances at Urban Stages, 259 West 30th Street between 7th and 8th Avenues. Fri -Performances: June 14 – June 21 Tues. & Wed. at 7:30, Thurs.-Sat. at 8pm and Sun. at 2pm.

 

Noah Hoffeld

Noah Hoffeld

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Cellist/pianist Noah Hoffeld will be performing at Bowery Electric, 327 Bowery at Joey Ramone, Place, Wednesday, June 17th, 7:45. Noah will be playing songs from his upcoming album- Play Human. Also ‘save the date, Wednesday August 5th, 8pm for what is sure to be an  amazing CD release party at the Bowery Electric. 

 

 

Annette Homann

Annette Homann

 

 

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Annette Homann will be performing with the North/South Consonance (Chamber Orchestra) at Christ and St. Stephen’s Church, 120 West 69th Street (between Broadway & Columbus), New York City, June 16th, 8 pm. Free admission.

 

 

 

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Out By Ten

Out By Ten

What do you get when you throw 3 Moth SLAM Champions together — Adam Wade, David Crabb, Tricia Rose Burt — and mix in a singer/songwriter — Ann Klein — who played with Ani DiFranco and the B-52s and on Broadway with Kinky Boots?  A mind-bending night with a barely-legal dose of hilarity.  Plus there’s an Open Mic at the end (and Open Mic-ers get a 25% discount — 50% if they bring a friend). Friday, June 19, 2015, 8:30 – 10 PM at Spectrum NYC, 121 Ludlow St. (betw. Delancey & Rivington).

 

 

Block Party in Greenwich Village

Block Party in Greenwich Village

Big Block Party in Greenwich Village! AWoW member Deborah Monlux presents: Catahoula Cajun Band at a street dance set in Manhattan on Sunday, June 21st at 4PM on West 8th Street at MacDougal Street (between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue). Dance to the band’s “Northern Fried” Cajun music of Southern Louisiana or sit at a bistro table near the stage and enjoy food and drink from nearby restaurants as you listen. In addition to musical performances, there will be dance, art, and games at the all-day party. Bring your father—and your kids—and celebrate Father’s Day at this pop-up Louisiana dance hall right in the middle of Greenwich Village!

AWoW MEMBERS PERFORMING in NYC THIS WEEK

Kira Simring and Nancy Manocherian

Kira Simring and Nancy Manocherian

Nancy Manocherian’s play “Hey Jude,” directed by Kira Simring at Urban Stages.  Tickets are $45, but AWoW members can get them for $20 by emailing info@artistswithoutwalls.com   Performances at Urban Stages, 259 West 30th Street between 7th and 8th Avenues.  Fri -Wed @ 7:30pm, Sun @ 2pm Performances: June 4 – June 21  Tues. & Wed. at 7:30, Thurs.-Sat. at 8pm and Sun. at 2pm.

 

Annette Homann

Annette Homann

 

 

Today, Sunday, June 7th, 2 pm, Annette Homann is performing with the Distinguished Concerts Orchestra and Distinguished Concerts Singers International at Carnegie Hall, W57th, St., NYC. The orchestra will be performing works of  FAURÉ, DURUFLÉ, DINOS CONSTANTINIDES

 

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Sasha Papernik

Sasha Papernik

 

On Thursday, June 11th, 6pm at Cornelia Street Cafe in New York City, Sasha Papernik and Alexander Wu will be officially launching their album, “Four Hand Band.” You can celebrate with them and hear them perform the new album live in its entirety. Poulenc, Gershwin, Bernstein, Berlin, Mozart, Bizet, Chopin…it’s going to be a wonderful night.

 

Click here for tickets, which are $10. Reservations are strongly encouraged.

 

Richard Stillman

Richard Stillman

Richard Stillman and Flip Peters’ “Spirit of Vaudeville” at The Concert Space at Beethoven Piano – NYC – June 11 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm | 211 West 58th St. (Between Broadway & 7th Ave.) – 10019. Richard’s Show the “Spirit Of Vaudeville” won the Best Concert award at the United Solo Theatre Festival in NYC. This Show takes place in the waning days of vaudeville when the jazz age was in full swing & the Charleston was all the rage. The tale is told through banjo strumming, eccentric tap dancing, vaudeville stories, ukulele & mandolin solos & the Charleston Dance! Concert Charge – $10.00 at the door

 

 

 

Noah Hoffeld

Noah Hoffeld

Cellist/pianist Noah Hoffeld will be performing at Bowery Electric, 327 Bowery at Joey Ramone, Place, Wednesday, June 17th, 7:45.